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The Chansons de Geste in the Age of RomancePolitical Fictions$
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Sarah Kay

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198151920

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151920.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.232) Conclusion
Source:
The Chansons de Geste in the Age of Romance
Author(s):

Sarah Kay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151920.003.0009

As the traditional view would illustrate how the chansons de geste and verse romances may have had a complementary relationship, this book aimed to provide an alternative view in analysing the relationship of these two different genres. While romance is often portrayed with respect to its rise, the chansons de geste are described in terms of how this genre and its poems have experienced a certain decline. By examining issues of social order such as the ‘filial discourse’, wherein the son is given more privileges than other family members and various hierarchical structures, we observe how chansons de geste and romances have a lot of common features. Although romances take on certain issues that chansons de geste are likely to ignore, the latter choose to neglect the ambiguity of language. This concluding chapter summarizes how the chansons de geste suggest a multi-focused narrative.

Keywords:   verse romance, filial discourse, multi-focused narrative

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