Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Thought and Art of Joseph Joubert (1754–1824)$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David P. Kinloch

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780198151838

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151838.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 November 2019

The Early Years

The Early Years

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 The Early Years
Source:
The Thought and Art of Joseph Joubert (1754–1824)
Author(s):

David P. Kinloch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151838.003.0002

This chapter focuses on an aspect of Joseph Joubert's activity, for it helps to counteract the tendency to dismiss him as the philosophic recluse of Villeneuve. Undoubtedly the passivity of Joubert's character can be irritating. He had a brilliant mind that was not averse to dealing memorably with issues of political and judicial significance. He articulates commonplace attitudes succinctly and with verve, sometimes managing to endow them with a poetic resonance that is refreshing for readers familiar with journalism and other ephemeral writings of the period. The chapter links his social and political concerns to the aesthetic issues that preoccupied him throughout his life and examines the period up to 1792–1793, since it is only against this background of encyclopédisme that his mature political beliefs may be understood.

Keywords:   Joseph Joubert, recluse, Villeneuve, passivity, journalism, aesthetics, political beliefs

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .