Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Patriot Opposition to WalpolePolitics, Poetry, and National Myth, 1725-1742$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christine Gerrard

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198129820

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198129820.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2019

Political Elizabethanism and the Spenser Revival

Political Elizabethanism and the Spenser Revival

Chapter:
(p.150) 6 Political Elizabethanism and the Spenser Revival
Source:
The Patriot Opposition to Walpole
Author(s):

Christine Gerrard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198129820.003.0006

This chapter examines the Elizabethan revival of the Robert Walpole era. Surprisingly little scholarship exists on one of the most inescapable features of this period: the widespread cult of Elizabeth I. Elizabeth's reign supplies the focal point for Bolingbroke's major political writings of the 1730s and historians have duly examined its significance. But most readings are confined to equating Bolingbroke's Elizabethan ‘nostalgia’ with his reactionary conservatism. The Elizabethan cult of the 1730s found expression in a wide variety of media, from the plethora of pamphlets generated by popular pressure for war with Spain, through to drama, painting, poetry, and statuary. For the aggressive, expansionist Protestant mercantilism associated with the victories of Cadiz and the Armada, an Elizabethanism shaped above all by pressure for war with Spain. But war with Spain was only one source of the complex patriotic manipulations of Elizabeth's golden age. Both Patriot Whigs and Court Whigs, operating from within a shared Protestant Hanoverian idiom which stressed the continuity of Protestant freedoms, competed over rival claims to represent ‘Elizabethan’ values.

Keywords:   Elizabeth I, Elizabethanism, Robert Walpole, Bolingbroke, mercantilism, Spain, Patriot Whigs, Court Whigs, drama, poetry

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .