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Staging Shakespeare's Late Plays$
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Roger Warren

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780198128779

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198128779.001.0001

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A Jealous Tyrant: The Winter's Tale

A Jealous Tyrant: The Winter's Tale

Chapter:
(p.95) 3 A Jealous Tyrant: The Winter's Tale
Source:
Staging Shakespeare's Late Plays
Author(s):

Roger Warren

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198128779.003.0004

One of Peter Hall's major concerns regarding The Winter's Tale involved how Shakespeare may have been associated with Sicily, since he somehow reversed Robert Greene's conception of Sicilia and Bohemia in Pandosto. Hall's initial conception of Sicilia was said to be ‘very sultry’ because Shakespeare perceived Sicilia to be – instead of how it is conventionally viewed, as the home of literary pastoral – a country of hot passions. One of the variations of this approach involves how David Williams was able to set the beginning of the play's action within a larger perspective. This chapter looks into the portrayals made by both the National Theatre and Ontario regarding the relationships of certain principals.

Keywords:   Peter Hall, The Winter's Tale, Sicilia, Bohemia, David Williams, Ontario, National Theatre

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