Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Wilfred Owen's VoicesLanguage and Community$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Douglas Kerr

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198123705

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198123705.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 May 2019

A Modern Voice

A Modern Voice

Chapter:
(p.257) 15 A Modern Voice
Source:
Wilfred Owen's Voices
Author(s):

Douglas Kerr

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198123705.003.0015

Although the roots of Owen's romantic dedication to poets, the ‘life of a Poet’, and to poetry in general are said to be established even before he moved to France in 1913, it cannot be denied that his stay in France also served as one of the most integral factors that influenced his understanding of ‘the profession of author’. His move to France was motivated by how he wanted to veer away from conservatism and provincialism. France became Owen's own school of modernity since this is where he initiated thoughts regarding what it meant to be a writer in the modern world. He also had to make much effort in terms of his French since the need to communicate in Bordeaux were far from where classroom French could take him. In spite of how he did not acquire formal teaching, he encountered several French writers whose tastes had established their reputations.

Keywords:   romantic dedication, France, profession of author, conservatism, provincialism, modernity, French

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .