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Hardy's Fables of IntegrityWoman, Body, Text$
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Marjorie Garson

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198122234

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122234.001.0001

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The Return of the Native, the Woodlanders: Reading the Body

The Return of the Native, the Woodlanders: Reading the Body

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 The Return of the Native, the Woodlanders: Reading the Body
Source:
Hardy's Fables of Integrity
Author(s):

Marjorie Garson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122234.003.0004

Frye notes a shift from heaven to earth and from the sky-father's sublime contemplation to the earth-mother's immersion in his study of Romantic imagery. In contrast to how the novel Far from the Madding Crowd resists Romanticism, The Return of the Native depicts a more Romantic response as it seems more appropriate for Frye's paradigm. However, readers who approach the novel with expectations would assert that the novel resists Romanticism as well. Despite how it demonstrates the uncanny and the sublime, there are several instances in which the text was not able to provide what it initially promised. This chapter concentrates on the issue of how to read these texts and it also examines The Woodlanders. The somatic imagery in the passage that describes the wood draws attention to how the corps morcelé is literalized repeatedly throughout the narrative.

Keywords:   corps morcelé, The Woodlanders, Romanticism, how to read, The Return of the Native

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