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Hardy's Fables of IntegrityWoman, Body, Text$
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Marjorie Garson

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198122234

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122234.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 September 2019

Far from the Madding Crowd:

Far from the Madding Crowd:

Venus' Looking Glass

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 Far from the Madding Crowd:
Source:
Hardy's Fables of Integrity
Author(s):

Marjorie Garson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122234.003.0003

The novel Far from the Madding Crowd was evidently constructed on a binary opposition pattern. This is illustrated in terms of contrasts between characters: the unromantic yet reliable Oak against the dashing Troy, the brunette Bathsheba who resists marriage against blonde Fanny Robin. Also, this theme can be seen through Bathsheba's self-sufficiency against Boldwood's monk-like celibacy. Here in this chapter, individual characters are examined in the context of their respective inner dualities. Moreover, the reader is encouraged by some of the chapter headings to set scene against scene and character against character in terms of thematic implications. This scheme is found to be not only manifest structurally but also rhetorically since sententious generalization passages are usually generated by antithesis. While the novel contains balanced aphorisms, it may also bring about the analysis of motive.

Keywords:   Far from the Madding Crowd, binary opposition, contrasts, motive, balanced aphorisms, thematic implications, rhetoric

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