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The Woman Reader 1837–1914$
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Kate Flint

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198121855

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198121855.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.321) 12 Conclusion
Source:
The Woman Reader 1837–1914
Author(s):

Kate Flint

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198121855.003.0012

Reading, in the Victorian and Edwardian period, as now, was an activity through which women could become aware of the simultaneity of the sensations of difference and of similarity. Reading provided the means not only, on occasion, for the Victorian woman to abnegate the self; to withdraw into the passivity induced by the opiate of fiction. Far more excitingly, it allowed her to assert her sense of selfhood, and to know that she was not alone in doing so. The variety of evidence put forward in this book demonstrates that despite the recurrence of certain stereotypes throughout the period, and the way in which these stereotypes functioned to determine attitudes about reading in the home, in education, and in the provision of public library facilities which would serve a growing number of readers, individuals frequently read across the grain of such expectations.

Keywords:   reading, Victorian women, stereotypes, education, fiction, Victorian period, Edwardian period

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