Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Epic RomanceHomer to Milton$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Colin Burrow

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198117940

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198117940.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Ariosto

Ariosto

Chapter:
(p.52) 3 Ariosto
Source:
Epic Romance
Author(s):

Colin Burrow

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198117940.003.0004

The playful, dislocating attitude to ancient literature is part of the delight of reading Italian epic romances. They swirl around, playing tricks, frustrating, enchanting, and getting nowhere with perfect charm. Readers have often felt this rootless detachment in the early sixteenth-century continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo, the Orlando furioso by Ludovico Ariosto. The heroes of Orlando furioso desperately seek the unbearably attractive Saracen princess Angelica, in many directions and with enormous rapidity. Whenever they reach her she vanishes, or they are unable to get their armour off to enjoy her, or with delicious wilfulness Ariosto abandons them before they achieve the consummation for which they so devoutly wish, and picks up another of the various threads of his manifold, exfoliating weave of narratives, leaving them, and us, panting. Even his own stories are not followed through to their anticipated conclusions, and are thrown away with wilful delight.

Keywords:   literature, epic, romance, Matteo Maria Boiardo, Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando furioso, princess, Angelica

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .