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Controlling the WaterMatching Technology and Institutions in Irrigation Management in India and Nepal$
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Dik Roth and Linden Vincent

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780198082927

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198082927.001.0001

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Decentralization, Water Rights, and Markets: Bridging the Technology–Policy Gap in Indian Irrigation

Decentralization, Water Rights, and Markets: Bridging the Technology–Policy Gap in Indian Irrigation

Chapter:
(p.59) 2 Decentralization, Water Rights, and Markets: Bridging the Technology–Policy Gap in Indian Irrigation
Source:
Controlling the Water
Author(s):

Dik Roth

Linden Vincent

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198082927.003.0003

Based on research in the warabandi and shejpali systems of irrigation prevalent in north-west and western India, this chapter proposes due consideration of technology in policy and institutional reforms in large-scale canal irrigation. Warabandi and shejpali represent two forms of water allocation corresponding to different technologies or design of canal irrigation systems. The chapter explores how the potential for market creation, redefinition of water rights, and decentralization varies in these systems. Though these three options are often considered as alternative approaches to irrigation management reform, they are rarely considered together or in relation to each other. Further, in most discussions of these, technology is a black box. How the potential of reform through these three approaches is shaped by the technology and systems of water allocation receives scant attention. This chapter makes a case for mainstreaming discussions of technology in proposals for irrigation management reform.

Keywords:   canal irrigation, decentralization, warabandi, shejpali, water markets, water users’ associations, technology–policy gap, irrigation in Maharashtra, irrigation in Haryana

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