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Controlling the WaterMatching Technology and Institutions in Irrigation Management in India and Nepal$
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Dik Roth and Linden Vincent

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780198082927

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198082927.001.0001

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Micro-hydel and Irrigation: Is Any Other Water Technology Different? 1

Micro-hydel and Irrigation: Is Any Other Water Technology Different? 1

Chapter:
(p.312) 11 Micro-hydel and Irrigation: Is Any Other Water Technology Different?1
Source:
Controlling the Water
Author(s):

Dik Roth

Linden Vincent

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198082927.003.0012

Micro-hydel development has been an important part of both energy and rural development policy in the hills of Nepal, and design choices and support policies have been shaped by both international actors and local development programmes. Micro-hydel development has often been integrated with local irrigation systems, requiring development in management of both electricity and irrigation services. Using case studies selected from different micro-hydel designs, this chapter explores how communities have taken action and struggled to evolve their power and irrigation systems and adapt designs, to support growing and changing needs. It uses both frameworks from irrigation research to look at evolution of accountabilities for effective system evolution, and wider frameworks from technology studies to study whether communities achieve technological democracy in their system development. It also discusses differences and similarities between the evolution of power and irrigation supplies, and their management organizations.

Keywords:   micro-hydel, farmer-managed irrigation systems, irrigation management, technological democracy, adaptive designs, accountability mechanisms, irrigation hills in Nepal, hydro-electricity policy, rural energy policy

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