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Globalization, International Law, and Human Rights$
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Jeffery F. Addicott, Md Jahid Hossain Bhuiyan, and Tareq M.R. Chowdhury

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780198074151

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198074151.001.0001

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The Place of Capitalism in Pursuit of Human Rights in Globalized Relationships of States

The Place of Capitalism in Pursuit of Human Rights in Globalized Relationships of States

Chapter:
(p.197) 8 The Place of Capitalism in Pursuit of Human Rights in Globalized Relationships of States
Source:
Globalization, International Law, and Human Rights
Author(s):

Mohsen al Attar

Ciaron Murnane

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198074151.003.0008

The world economy is firmly within the grip of capitalist economic ideology, specifically its competitive predisposition, while collective global consciousness is dominated by a unified commitment to social justice and personal freedom through poverty elimination, as expressed via the human rights narrative. This chapter highlights the paradox and the vast and wide gap between these competing doctrines; a predatory market mentality versus a progressive human mentality; class privilege versus human solidarity. It begins by considering the theoretical bases of the doctrines, then delves into a case study—South Africa—that assists in better explicating the challenges posed by the capitalist economic superstructure to the concurrent actualization of both sets of human rights.

Keywords:   capitalism, world economy, social justice, personal freedom, South Africa, human rights, Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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