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GokhaleThe Indian Moderates and the British Raj$
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B. R. Nanda

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780195647518

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195647518.001.0001

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The Last Battle

The Last Battle

Chapter:
(p.435) 39 The Last Battle
Source:
Gokhale
Author(s):

B. R. Nanda

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195647518.003.0039

This chapter describes Lord Hardinge’s distrust of Gokhale. This distrust was not new. It had been entertained not only by Hardinge, but by his predecessors, Minto and Curzon, who had reacted to Gokhale with a peculiar mixture of admiration, suspicion, and irritation. At the end of 1913, Hardinge had reasons to be annoyed with Gokhale because of the strongly nationalist line he was taking on the Public Services Commission. The Commission was inquiring into the methods of recruitment, systems of training, and terms and remuneration of imperial and provincial services in India. To Gokhale, and to all politically conscious Indians, the Commission was not merely an instrument for securing a few more posts or slightly better terms for their countrymen, but a potential weapon for breaking the British monopoly of the higher levels of administration in India.

Keywords:   Lord Hardinge, Gopal Krishna Gokhale, Minto, Curzon, Public Services Commission, British monopoly, Indian administration

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