Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Silencing the Self Across CulturesDepression and Gender in the Social World$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dana C. Jack and Alisha Ali

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195398090

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2019

Self-Silencing and the Risk of Heart Disease and Death in Women: The Framingham Offspring Study

Self-Silencing and the Risk of Heart Disease and Death in Women: The Framingham Offspring Study

Chapter:
(p.399) Chapter 18 Self-Silencing and the Risk of Heart Disease and Death in Women: The Framingham Offspring Study
Source:
Silencing the Self Across Cultures
Author(s):

Elaine D. Eaker

Margaret Kelly-Hayes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.003.0020

This chapter presents data from the Framingham Offspring Study where data were collected on 3682 men and women who were followed for 10 years to document the occurrence of heart disease or death. This study included a measure of self-silencing that asked participants how they dealt with conflict with their spouse. After adjusting for the standard risk factors, the data revealed that women who self-silenced during conflict with their spouse, compared with women who did not, had four times the risk of dying over the 10 years of follow-up. The authors examine this finding and discuss the damaging effects of not engaging with one’s spouse during conflict. The chapter also discusses the importance of future research investigating the many possible health-related consequences of self-silencing.

Keywords:   self-silencing, mortality, heart disease, relational conflict, stress

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .