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Silencing the Self Across CulturesDepression and Gender in the Social World$
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Dana C. Jack and Alisha Ali

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195398090

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.001.0001

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Authentic Self-Expression: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture

Authentic Self-Expression: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture

Chapter:
(p.261) Chapter 12 Authentic Self-Expression: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture
Source:
Silencing the Self Across Cultures
Author(s):

Anjoo Sikka

Linda (Gratch) Vaden-Goad

Lisa K. Waldner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.003.0013

This chapter explores the portability of the self-silencing construct across a range of contexts and cultures. The authors present findings from their studies investigating correlations between depression, self-esteem, relationship adjustment, role taking, conflict tactics, and social class across diverse ethnicities, sexual orientations, and gender. These studies included samples of ethnic minority college students; community samples of young club-going singles and female dancers; urbanites in western India; Pakistani and Indian women immigrants to America with arranged marriages; and community samples of gays, lesbians, and heterosexuals in committed relationships. The results of these studies demonstrate the multifaceted nature of the self-silencing construct, as well as its relevance to topics such as violence and high-risk sexual behaviors. The authors suggest topics for future investigations that grow out of their research.

Keywords:   self-silencing, culture, sexual orientation, high-risk sexual behaviors, gender, interpersonal violence, silencing the self scale

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