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DiakoniaRe-Interpreting the Ancient Sources$
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John N Collins

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195396027

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195396027.001.0001

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Spokesmen and Emissaries of Heaven

Spokesmen and Emissaries of Heaven

Chapter:
(p.195) 10. Spokesmen and Emissaries of Heaven
Source:
Diakonia
Author(s):

John N. Collins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195396027.003.0011

The preceding chapter illustrated that a substantial part of Christian usage relates to the passing on of revelation and in so doing conforms to the general usage where the cognate words for “diakonia” appear in connection with message from the gods and with the notion of mediation. The present chapter examines usage relating to traveling in the name of a community or in the name of an evangelist. The abstract noun and the verb related to “diakonia” are prominent among terms used by Paul in discussing the collection for the poor in Jerusalem. The abstract noun occurs twice in Luke's account of the mission from Antioch to Jerusalem (Acts 11:27–30; 12:25). In the letter to Philemon from his prison, Paul writes warm words of commendation of Onesimus, the Christian slave he is sending back to Philemon, the rightful owner.

Keywords:   Paul, diakonia, traveling, community, evangelist, collection, poor, Jerusalem, Antioch, Onesimus

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