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Spinoza's MetaphysicsSubstance and Thought$
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Yitzhak Y. Melamed

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780195394054

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195394054.001.0001

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The Substance-Mode Relation as a Relation of Inherence and Predication

The Substance-Mode Relation as a Relation of Inherence and Predication

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 The Substance-Mode Relation as a Relation of Inherence and Predication
Source:
Spinoza's Metaphysics
Author(s):

Yitzhak Y. Melamed

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195394054.003.0001

In the first chapter I study the substance-mode relation in Spinoza, and criticize Edwin Curley's influential interpretation of the nature of this relation. Relying on a variety of texts and considerations, I establish that Spinozist modes both inhere in and are predicated of the substance. I show that Pierre Bayle's famous critique of Spinoza's claim that all things inhere in God is based on crucial misunderstandings. I also argue that this claim of Spinoza's involves no category mistake, and I criticize Curley's use of the principle of charity to motivate his reading. Finally, I discuss the similarities between Spinoza's understanding of modes and current trope theories.

Keywords:   Substance, Inherence, Predication, Pantheism, Pierre Bayle, Edwin Curley, Trope Theory, Charitable Interpretations, Descartes, Aristotle

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