Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Magic and the MindMechanisms, Functions, and Development of Magical Thinking and Behavior$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eugene Subbotsky

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195393873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393873.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 July 2019

Magical Beliefs and Psychological Defense

Magical Beliefs and Psychological Defense

Chapter:
(p.115) 10 Magical Beliefs and Psychological Defense
Source:
Magic and the Mind
Author(s):

Eugene Subbotsky

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393873.003.0010

Chapter 10 (“Magical Beliefs and Psychological Defense”) considers defense strategies that people use to protect themselves against magical suggestion. Indeed, being totally vulnerable to suggestion would mean living in an unsafe world that lacks order and predictability. Experiments are presented and discussed that show some of these strategies. For example, cognitive defense against magical suggestion is demonstrated in the experiment when participants involuntarily distort the order of events that happened in their full view just a few seconds before, with the aim to discard a magical (impossible) event and reinterpret it as an ordinary (possible) event. A more effective emotional defense was observed when participants (graduate and undergraduate students) were asked to select a practical task that they would like to improve on (such as writing essays or speaking foreign languages) and then it was magically suggested that they would improve on it. In 2 weeks' time, in the magical suggestion condition, a significantly larger number of participants reported having no improvement than in the control condition, in which no suggestion had been made.

Keywords:   magical beliefs, psychological defense, suggestion, dreams, subconsciousness

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .