Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Who Knew?Responsibility Without Awareness$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

George Sher

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195389197

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195389197.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 June 2019

Kantian Fairness

Kantian Fairness

Chapter:
(p.55) Four Kantian Fairness
Source:
Who Knew?
Author(s):

George Sher (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195389197.003.0004

This chapter continues the quest for a positive rationale for the searchlight view. It extends the attempt made in Chapter 3 to derive the view from the deliberative perspective by introducing the principle that it is unfair to hold people responsible for features or results of their acts that they did not foresee. The central problem for this strategy is to articulate and defend the relevant notion of fairness, here dubbed “Kantian fairness” because of its affinities with Kant's views about moral worth. Although any demand that an agent cannot see how to meet is bound to seem unfair from his perspective, the crucial question is why the agent's perspective should be authoritative in determining whether it is fair for others, who occupy different perspectives, to hold him responsible. Although several possible answers to this question are examined, none is found to succeed.

Keywords:   responsibility, Kant, fairness, first-person, third-person, deliberation, identification

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .