Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Social Movements and the Transformation of American Health Care$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jane Banaszak-Holl, Sandra Levitsky, and Mayer Zald

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195388299

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388299.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 November 2019

Framing Hazards in the Health Arena

Framing Hazards in the Health Arena

The Cases of Obesity, Work-Related Illnesses, and Human Egg Donation

Chapter:
(p.284) 17 Framing Hazards in the Health Arena
Source:
Social Movements and the Transformation of American Health Care
Author(s):

David A. Snow

Roberta G. Lessor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388299.003.0017

Snow and Lessor examine the challenges to social movements posed by unclear, incorrect, or disputed diagnoses of health problems. Social movement researchers generally agree that collective action requires, among other things, shared collective action frames—or common understandings of a given problem and proposed collective solutions. In this chapter, the authors explore how framing hazards can encumber the efforts of medical practitioners and other health‐oriented stakeholders to deal with various health problems and issues. Drawing on three distinct case studies—the obesity “epidemic,” work‐related diseases, and gamete transfer in infertility—they elaborate four types of framing hazards or vulnerabilities: ambiguous events or ailments that do not fit neatly into an existing frame; framing errors or misframings based on erroneous beliefs; frame disputes involving competing explanations or interpretations of events; and frame shifts involving the displacement of one frame by another. The authors conclude by considering the implications of framing hazards for collective attempts to prevent or remedy health problems more generally.

Keywords:   social movements, framing, collective action, health care, policy reform

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .