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Immigration WorldwidePolicies, Practices, and Trends$
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Uma A. Segal, Doreen Elliott, and Nazneen S. Mayadas

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195388138

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388138.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 September 2019

Australia

Australia

The World in One Place

Chapter:
(p.153) 11 Australia
Source:
Immigration Worldwide
Author(s):

Mel Gray

Agllias Kylie

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388138.003.0011

As in other predominantly English—speaking countries in the West, the vast majority of Australia's population comprises immigrants. While vigorous attempts have been made over the years to plan and control immigration, it has proven extremely difficult to balance the ethnic composition of the population with economic needs. In this chapter immigration in Australia is examined, including its chronological development, waves of policy change, statistical trends, the countries of origin of Australia's immigrants, services provided for them on arrival, reasons why people come to Australia, and the costs and benefits of immigration. Several historical periods in Australia's immigration are identified beginning with the period of nation building and the assimilationist white Australia policy (1901–1973) followed by multiculturalism, which persists today though the thorny question of asylum seekers complicated by the events of 9/11 looked set to threaten Australia's image of itself as a country in which diverse cultures live together harmoniously.

Keywords:   immigration, Australia, multiculturalism, mandatory detention, refugees and asylum seekers

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