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American Saint Francis Asbury and the Methodists$
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John Wigger

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195387803

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387803.001.0001

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“We were great too soon”

“We were great too soon”

Chapter:
(p.253) 15 “We were great too soon”
Source:
American Saint Francis Asbury and the Methodists
Author(s):

John Wigger (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387803.003.0016

Cokesbury College burned to the ground in December 1795, marking the end of American Methodism’s first college. Most early Methodists did not have the means to send their children to college, and Cokesbury had always struggled financially. The 1796 General Conference did not have the drama of the 1792 meeting, but it did fix the boundaries of six permanent annual conferences and embraced the Chartered Fund to support preachers and their families in need. The conference also led to tension between Coke and Asbury. While many of the American preachers were unhappy about Coke’s long absences in Europe, Coke believed that Asbury and the American preachers did not give him the respect he deserved. Nonetheless, Coke and Asbury managed to collaborate on a new annotated version of the Discipline, published in 1798.

Keywords:   Annual conferences, Chartered Fund, Thomas Coke, Cokesbury College, Discipline, General Conference, preachers

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