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American Saint Francis Asbury and the Methodists$
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John Wigger

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195387803

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387803.001.0001

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“Such a time…was never seen before”

“Such a time…was never seen before”

Chapter:
(p.159) 9 “Such a time…was never seen before”
Source:
American Saint Francis Asbury and the Methodists
Author(s):

John Wigger (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387803.003.0010

Despite the revolutionary implications of the Christmas conference, much remained the same. The church’s theology and culture remained the same and Asbury was recognized as the church’s most important leader. Coke returned from England in 1787 with instructions from John Wesley to ordain Richard Whatcoat a superintendent. The American preachers, led by James O’Kelly, rejected Wesley’s directions and reduced Coke’s authority in America. The year 1787 also marked the beginning of a sustained revival that extended through 1789, particularly across the South. Asbury encouraged and welcomed the revival, though the resulting expansion of the church increased his workload significantly.

Keywords:   Thomas Coke, leader, James O’Kelly, revival, south, superintendent, theology, John Wesley, Richard Whatcoat

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