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Listening through the NoiseThe Aesthetics of Experimental Electronic Music$
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Joanna Demers

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195387650

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387650.001.0001

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Minimal Objects in Microsound

Minimal Objects in Microsound

Chapter:
(p.69) 3 Minimal Objects in Microsound
Source:
Listening through the Noise
Author(s):

Joanna Demers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387650.003.0003

Unlike the genres profiled in chapters 1 and 2, other forms of electronic music treat sound not as a sign but as an object, an entity with no preexisting semantic content. chapter 3 looks at the minimal objects in microsound, a form of electronic music that utilizes brief, usually quiet particles of sound. Microsound artists exhibit surprising consistency in their search for sounds that are supposedly expressionless. The chapter connects this predilection to a similar desire among minimalist visual artists of the 1960s for “objecthood,” Michael Fried’s term characterizing sculpture that appropriates discrete objects for their physical rather than referential attributes.

Keywords:   Michael Fried, microsound, minimal, object, objecthood, reference, sound object

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