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Artifacts in Behavioral ResearchRobert Rosenthal and Ralph L. Rosnow's Classic Books$
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Robert Rosenthal and Ralph L. Rosnow

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195385540

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195385540.001.0001

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Interpretation of Data

Interpretation of Data

Chapter:
(p.308) 2 Interpretation of Data
Source:
Artifacts in Behavioral Research
Author(s):

Robert Rosenthal

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195385540.003.0010

Identical observations are often interpreted differently by different scientists, and that fact and its implications are the subject of this chapter. Interpretation effects are most simply defined as any difference in interpretations. The difference may be between two or more interpreters, or an interpreter and such a generalized interpreter as an established theory or an “accepted” interpretation of a cumulative series of studies. As in the observer effect, the interpreter effect, or difference, does not necessarily imply a unidirectional phenomenon. When observations are nonrandomly distributed around a true value, these are referred to as “biased observations.” Similarly, when interpretations do not vary randomly—and usually they do not—these are referred to as “biased”.

Keywords:   interpreter effects, data interpretation, physical sciences, biological sciences, behavioral sciences

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