Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
First Do No Self HarmUnderstanding and Promoting Physician Stress Resilience$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Charles Figley, Peter Huggard, and Charlotte Rees

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780195383263

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195383263.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 10 December 2019

Emergency Medicine

Emergency Medicine

Chapter:
(p.339) 24 Emergency Medicine
Source:
First Do No Self Harm
Author(s):

Lisa Moreno-Walton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195383263.003.0024

Lisa Moreno-Walton, a Tulane University emergency physician, associate professor and medical educator, writes about her profession in Chapter 24, addressing three fundamental questions. Why do emergency physicians choose emergency medicine? What are the stressors? Her final question is addressed at the end of this power essay: How can I see what is worst about people and still retain my faith in humanity? The author wryly notes that emergency physicians (EPs) are like no other for their love of action and challenge, acute care, and the life and death of practicing medicine in “real time.” Emergency medicine provides exhilaration for those who seek and thrive in it. EPs must endure an extraordinary amount of pressure to perform. Answering her final question of how one deals with the bad as well as the good, Moreno-Walton talks about the need for perspective taking and doing so with humor and sufficient self-monitoring and the help of trusted colleagues.

Keywords:   House of Medicine, EP characteristics, EP stressors, patient advocacy, personal life tolls, protective factors

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .