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The Global Clinical MovementEducating Lawyers for Social Justice$
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Frank S. Bloch

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195381146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.001.0001

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Beyond Legal Imperialism: US Clinical Legal Education and the New Law and Development

Beyond Legal Imperialism: US Clinical Legal Education and the New Law and Development

Chapter:
(p.134) 9 Beyond Legal Imperialism: US Clinical Legal Education and the New Law and Development
Source:
The Global Clinical Movement
Author(s):

RICHARD J. WILSON

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0009

This chapter explores both a brief typology for the import and export of law, and three different stages in the law and development movement. It also examines the export of US clinical legal education in the context of that movement and argues that it is not legal imperialism, at least in the context of law and development theory as it is practiced today. It reviews the first stage of law and development policy (1960s to mid-1970s), which comes the closest to legal imperialism, but argues that even that critique is flawed. In the second, “rule of law and democracy” stage (1980s and 1990s) and the third, or “human rights and freedom” stage (late 1990s forward), clinical legal education has taken on an increasingly important, but always secondary place in the range of development priorities and alternatives.

Keywords:   clinical legal education, legal imperialism, clinical imperialism, legal transplants, legal transfer, US foreign policy, law and development, rule of law, democracy, freedom, human rights

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