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The Global Clinical MovementEducating Lawyers for Social Justice$
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Frank S. Bloch

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195381146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.001.0001

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Japan’s New Clinical Programs: A Study of Light and Shadow

Japan’s New Clinical Programs: A Study of Light and Shadow

Chapter:
(p.105) 7 Japan’s New Clinical Programs: A Study of Light and Shadow
Source:
The Global Clinical Movement
Author(s):

SHIGEO MIYAGAWA

TAKAO SUAMI

PETER A JOY

CHARLES D WEISSELBERG

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0007

This chapter examines clinical legal education in Japan and its teaching and service goals in the context of the new structure of Japanese legal education. Japan has embarked on a series of reforms aimed at transforming its justice system and the way in which it educates lawyers. As a major part of its reforms, Japan instituted a new system of graduate professional legal education when new law schools opened their doors in 2004. The law schools are an integral component of far-reaching reforms that seek to improve the administration of justice by increasing the number of lawyers, especially in grossly underserved rural areas, and better preparing attorneys for the practice of law domestically and internationally. The chapter also discusses the role of the Japan Clinical Legal Education Association (JCLEA) and the obstacles clinical education faces due to low bar passage rates and resistance to law students participating in the delivery of legal services to clients.

Keywords:   Japan, teaching, service, bar passage, reform, legal education, law students, justice system, international law, rural areas

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