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The Global Clinical MovementEducating Lawyers for Social Justice$
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Frank S. Bloch

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195381146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.001.0001

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Justice Education, Law Reform, and the Clinical Method

Justice Education, Law Reform, and the Clinical Method

Chapter:
(p.211) 14 Justice Education, Law Reform, and the Clinical Method
Source:
The Global Clinical Movement
Author(s):

LES MCCRIMMON

EDWARD SANTOW

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0014

This chapter discusses, in the context of institutional law reform and direct social justice advocacy, why law students should become involved in law reform, arguing that law schools should do more than equip their students to be good legal technicians. Law schools should also instil in their students an understanding of, as well as a commitment to, what the law should be in a just society. In particular, the chapter consider two law reform oriented projects that adopt elements of the clinical method to inculcate in law students a broader understanding of the role practicing lawyers can play to achieve systemic justice: the internship program at the Australian Law Reform Commission, and the Social Justice Advocacy Project housed within the University of New South Wales Law Faculty.

Keywords:   legal technicians, clinical method, internship, law reform, Australian Law Reform Commission, just society, social justice, advocacy, systemic justice

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