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Advances in Culture and PsychologyVolume 1$
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Michele J. Gelfand, Chi-yue Chiu, and Ying-yi Hong

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195380392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380392.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2020

Culture, Emotion, and Expression

Culture, Emotion, and Expression

Chapter:
(p.52) Chapter 2 Culture, Emotion, and Expression
Source:
Advances in Culture and Psychology
Author(s):

David Matsumoto

Hyi Sung Hwang

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380392.003.0002

This chapter describes the major research findings from our program of research on culture, emotion, and expression over the past thirty years, covering both studies examining the judgment of emotional stimuli across cultures (judgment studies) as well as studies examining the production of emotional expressions across cultures (production studies). Within both sets of studies, the chapter reports aspects of emotional expressions that are panculturally universal, as well as those that are culture-specific. The chapter presents new evidence demonstrating the likely biological innateness of an archaic, evolutionarily evolved, pancultural emotion system. Considering the existence of both universal, biologically based aspects as well as culture-specific aspects of emotional expressions, the chapter presents a theoretical framework describing the cultural calibration of the biologically-innate, evolutionarily evolved system to account for universality and cultural differences.

Keywords:   culture, emotion, expression, facial expression, nonverbal behavior, display rules, cultural calibration, universality, culture-specificity

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