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Support Processes in Intimate Relationships$
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Kieran T. Sullivan and Joanne Davila

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195380170

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380170.001.0001

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The Effects of Daily Support Transactions During Acute Stress: Results from a Diary Study of Bar Exam Preparation

The Effects of Daily Support Transactions During Acute Stress: Results from a Diary Study of Bar Exam Preparation

Chapter:
(p.175) chapter 7 The Effects of Daily Support Transactions During Acute Stress: Results from a Diary Study of Bar Exam Preparation
Source:
Support Processes in Intimate Relationships
Author(s):

Patrick E. Shrout

Niall Bolger

Masumi Iida

Christopher Burke

Marci E. J. Gleason

Sean P. Lane

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195380170.003.0007

Although social support is known to be beneficial in general, daily support receipt has been associated with negative effects on daily negative mood, unless the support acts are “invisible,” i.e. provided by partner but unnoticed by recipient. In this chapter, the timing of these effects is examined using structured daily diary reports of recent law school graduates (N = 312) and their intimate partners during a 5-week preparation period before the graduates sat for the state bar examination. Examinees reported mood at waking and in the evening. Using multilevel models, the authors checked if support receipt (reported by examinee) and provision (reported by partner) on one day were related to examinee’s mood on the same evening, the next morning, and the next evening. The authors failed to replicate the invisible support pattern, instead finding that provider reports of emotional support were associated with increased negative mood for all time lags. Daily emotional support receipt was positively associated with vigor in the evening on both same and next days.

Keywords:   daily diaries, relationships, stress, social support

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