Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Perfect Moral StormThe Ethical Tragedy of Climate Change$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen M. Gardiner

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195379440

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195379440.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 October 2019

The Tyranny of the Contemporary

The Tyranny of the Contemporary

Chapter:
(p.143) Chapter 5 The Tyranny of the Contemporary
Source:
A Perfect Moral Storm
Author(s):

Stephen M. Gardiner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195379440.003.0006

This chapter argues that the distant future poses a severe moral problem, the nature and extent of which has not yet been adequately appreciated. It also claims (1) that the problem is the main concern of distinctively intergenerational ethics, and (2) that it occurs both in a pure, long-term form manifest across human history and global populations, and also in degenerate forms which apply to shorter time periods and to social institutions. The problem is compared with the traditional prisoner's dilemma analysis, and climate change is offered as a leading example. Three major objections are also considered: the invisible hand, future uncertainty, and the philosophical non-identity problem made popular by Derek Parfit

Keywords:   generations, intergenerational justice, fairy tale, pure intergenerational problem, non-identity problem, invisible hand, game theory

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .