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The Doha BluesInstitutional Crisis and Reform in the WTO$
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Kent Jones

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195378825

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378825.001.0001

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Institutional Friction in the Doha Development Round

Institutional Friction in the Doha Development Round

Chapter:
(p.21) 2 Institutional Friction in the Doha Development Round
Source:
The Doha Blues
Author(s):

Kent Jones

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378825.003.0002

Although the WTO continued what the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) has started, WTO differed from GATT in the following features: the single undertaking in negotiated multilateral trade agreements, panel decisions and their binding nature, and stricter requirements for new members. While the WTO was created to expand membership in the world trading system, to extend trade liberalization, and to strengthen the members' commitment, these modifications have posed problems in the negotiating process which are referred to as “institutional friction”. As it was observed that developing countries had a significant role yet reaped disappointing results in such arrangements, the failures of the Doha Round are said to have been rooted on the Uruguay Round—the trade negotiation setup that is said to have been the most ambitious.

Keywords:   WTO, GATT, world trade system, trade liberalization, institutional friction, Uruguay Round, Doha Round

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