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Music in Renaissance Ferrara 1400–1505The Creation of a Musical Center in the Fifteenth Century$
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Lewis Lockwood

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195378276

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378276.001.0001

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Cathedral Music

Cathedral Music

Chapter:
(p.80) 8 Cathedral Music
Source:
Music in Renaissance Ferrara 1400–1505
Author(s):

Lewis Lockwood

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195378276.003.0009

Although the cathedral lagged behind the court chapel as a focus of polyphonic practice, some new evidence has emerged that sharpens the perspective on the two institutions. One such piece of evidence is a set of small polyphonic fragments; another is formed by new biographical data on the music theorist, Ugolino di Orvieto, who was a member of the cathedral hierarchy during the years of Leonello’s education and rule. The coexistence in Ferrara of various diverse categories and styles of musical expression presents no more bewildering a pattern of diversity than do the flatly opposed contemporary intellectual approaches of a scholastic commentator like Ugolino and a humanist teacher like Guarino. Their divergent perceptions of learning and teaching form polar extremes.

Keywords:   Ferrarese court culture, Ugolino di Orvieto, scholastic music, humanistic music, Guarino

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