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Quotas for Women in PoliticsGender and Candidate Selection Reform Worldwide$
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Mona Lena Krook

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195375671

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375671.001.0001

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Reserved Seats in Pakistan and India

Reserved Seats in Pakistan and India

Chapter:
(p.57) FOUR Reserved Seats in Pakistan and India
Source:
Quotas for Women in Politics
Author(s):

Mona Lena Krook (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375671.003.0004

This chapter compares campaigns for reserved seats in Pakistan and India. A shared colonial past included reserved seats for women in politics, as well as for a range of other groups based on race, religion, education, and occupation. After independence, however, the two countries took opposite approaches. In Pakistan, regimes of all types reserved seats for women from the early 1950s until the late 1980s, with a new round of reforms being introduced in 2002. In India, reservations for women were put off until the late 1980s, when their passage in various states led to proposals in the early 1990s to set aside seats for women in local government. Despite the quick passage of these provisions, attempts to extend these provisions to the national level have foundered. As a result, women occupy 21% of the seats in parliament in Pakistan, but only 8% in India.

Keywords:   gender quotas, women in politics, reserved seats, colonialism, women and Islam, dictatorship, India, Pakistan

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