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The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece$
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Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195375183

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375183.001.0001

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From the Peloponnesian War to the Enthronement of Philip II of Macedonia

From the Peloponnesian War to the Enthronement of Philip II of Macedonia

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 From the Peloponnesian War to the Enthronement of Philip II of Macedonia
Source:
The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece
Author(s):

Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375183.003.0001

Chapter 1 details the origin and development of the slogan of freedom, focusing on the relationship between “freedom” and “autonomy,” the significance of the “autonomy clause” in the King’s Peace of 386, and the meaning and uses of the phrase “common peace.” It shows that treaties of peace served the dual purpose of providing a framework for military alliances among the most powerful Greek cities (Athens, Sparta, Thebes) and of using the “autonomy clause” and the slogan of freedom to demolish rival military alliances, as if protecting the freedom and autonomy of their individual members. The inability of the King’s Peace and its subsequent incarnations in 375 and 371 to defend peace and freedom in Greece brought about the idea of a “common peace,” which offered protection only to those Greek cities that participated in the treaty of peace.

Keywords:   King’s Peace, common peace, autonomy clause, Athens, Sparta, Thebes

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