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The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece$
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Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195375183

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375183.001.0001

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The Slogan of Freedom from the King’s Peace to the Pax Romana

The Slogan of Freedom from the King’s Peace to the Pax Romana

Chapter:
(p.351) Epilogue The Slogan of Freedom from the King’s Peace to the Pax Romana
Source:
The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece
Author(s):

Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195375183.003.0010

The Epilogue outlines general trends in the development of the Greek slogan of freedom from its inception in the fifth century to the Hellenistic period and through its diverse uses by the Romans. Professing their support for Greek freedom gave the Romans a valid excuse for defending their interests in Greece and for claiming a special place in Greek affairs as the “champions of [Greek] freedom” and, therefore, as the “common benefactors” to all the Greeks. The Romans put the slogan of freedom forward to justify aggressions against Antiochos III, Nabis, Perseus, and the Achaean League. The slogan of freedom turned into the basis for relations between Rome and those individual Greek communities that pledged their loyalty to Rome in return for the status of a free city, thus supporting the foundation of the Roman Peace.

Keywords:   King’s Peace, Roman Peace, Pax Romana, common benefactors”, Antiochos III, Nabis, Perseus, the Achaean League

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