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Adaptive Perspectives on Human–Technology InteractionMethods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction$
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Alex Kirlik

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195374827

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374827.001.0001

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Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill

Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill

Chapter:
(p.55) 5 Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill
Source:
Adaptive Perspectives on Human–Technology Interaction
Author(s):

William J. Horrey

Christopher D. Wickens

Richard Strauss

Alex Kirlik

Thomas R. Stewart

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374827.003.0006

This chapter presents a study of human performers' ability to integrate multiple sources of displayed, uncertain information in a laboratory simulation of threat assessment in a battlefield environment. Two different types of automated aids were used to enhance the situation display, the first guiding visual attention to relevant cues, the second recommending an actual judgment. The chapter also assesses performance in terms of skill score, as well as its decomposition using Stewart's refinement of Murphy's skill score measure using Brunswik's lens model. Results indicate that the introduction of display enhancement in this task has both benefits and costs, in terms of performance. Modeling offers plausible interpretations of these (in some cases counterintuitive) effects. It is noted here that the skill score decomposition augmented with lens model analysis shows results that would not be readily apparent using more traditional measures of performance such as percent correct or reaction time. It is believed that this research provides a useful demonstration of how additional insights into situation assessment and human-automation interaction can be gained by analysis and modeling that simultaneously describes human judgment, the task environment, and their interaction.

Keywords:   attention guidance, diagnostic aiding, visual attention, judgment, skill score, display enhancement, costs, lens model

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