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Anthropology and Public HealthBridging Differences in Culture and Society$
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Robert A Hahn and Marcia Inborn

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195374643

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374643.001.0001

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Bureaucratic Aspects of International Health Programs

Bureaucratic Aspects of International Health Programs

Chapter:
(p.681) 24 Bureaucratic Aspects of International Health Programs
Source:
Anthropology and Public Health
Author(s):

George M. Foster

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374643.003.0025

The stated goals of World Health Organization-supported behavioral research are applied: to contribute to planning and policy decision-making, and to improve health care delivery methods. The evidence suggests the organization is getting less for its behavioral research dollar than it ought to; much research has been of poor quality, and researchers often appear more concerned with research design elegance than with practical application of results. In their grant applications, behavioral scientists conform to the expectations of research committees, stressing quantitative methods and slighting the qualitative approaches that often are more productive in providing operational information. Research on organization policies and programs is viewed as irrelevant and perhaps even threatening. To improve the quality and utility of WHO-sponsored behavioral research, this book suggests a workshop of organization personnel and short-term consultants and temporary advisors with prior experience, to evaluate past research and to recommend modified research support procedures for higher quality, operationally-useful results.

Keywords:   WHO, global health, anthropology, bureaucracy, organization

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