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Anthropology and Public HealthBridging Differences in Culture and Society$
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Robert A Hahn and Marcia Inborn

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195374643

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374643.001.0001

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“Sanitary Makeshifts” and the Perpetuation of Health Stratification in Indonesia

“Sanitary Makeshifts” and the Perpetuation of Health Stratification in Indonesia

Chapter:
(p.541) 19 “Sanitary Makeshifts” and the Perpetuation of Health Stratification in Indonesia
Source:
Anthropology and Public Health
Author(s):

Eric A. Stein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374643.003.0020

This chapter examines the economic, ethical, and cultural complexities of health policies that emphasize “cost-effectiveness” at the expense of creating stable health infrastructure. Drawing on ethnographic, archival, and oral history research in rural Central Java, Indonesia, it examines latrine and toilet construction efforts from the time of 1930s Rockefeller Foundation hookworm prevention projects to the present. Although hygiene and sanitation projects since the 1970s enabled over half of rural villagers to build indoor toilets, lack of water and drainage, patterns of drought, and the economy of fishponds has fostered continued public defecation in rivers, ponds, and drainage canals. Makeshift or partially completed sanitation programs have led to wide disparities in access to water and toilets. As a consequence, social difference has become encoded at the level of sanitary objects, as indoor toilets become temporal markers of status within village hierarchies centered on development discourses of modernization.

Keywords:   sanitation, Indonesia, inequality, Rockefeller Foundation, anthropology

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