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The Evolution of Personality and Individual Differences$
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David M. Buss and Patricia H. Hawley

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195372090

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372090.001.0001

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Ecological Approaches to Personality

Ecological Approaches to Personality

Chapter:
(p.210) 8 Ecological Approaches to Personality
Source:
The Evolution of Personality and Individual Differences
Author(s):

Aurelio José Figueredo

Pedro S. A. Wolf

Paul R. Gladden

Sally Olderbak

Dok J. Andrzejczak

W. Jake Jacobs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372090.003.0008

This chapter reviews the theoretical arguments and empirical evidence that individual variation in personality and behavior is shaped by a combination of: frequency-dependent niche-splitting, developmental plasticity, genetic diversification, directional social selection, and behavioral flexibility. It argues that extant theory and data are inconsistent with the aim of assigning the evolution of individual differences to any one selective pressure to the exclusion of all others. Instead, the ecological conditions intrinsic to the social circumstances of many species, including humans, favor a combination of these shaping pressures. Thus, the only single superordinate category that includes most of these convergent and divergent selective pressures is social selection.

Keywords:   individual differences, personality, frequency-dependent niche-splitting, developmental plasticity, genetic diversification, directional social selection, behavioral flexibility

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