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The Evolution of Personality and Individual Differences$
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David M. Buss and Patricia H. Hawley

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195372090

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372090.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2019

The Role of Competition and Cooperation in Shaping Personality: An Evolutionary Perspective on Social Dominance, Machiavellianism, and Children’s Social Development

The Role of Competition and Cooperation in Shaping Personality: An Evolutionary Perspective on Social Dominance, Machiavellianism, and Children’s Social Development

Chapter:
(p.61) 3 The Role of Competition and Cooperation in Shaping Personality: An Evolutionary Perspective on Social Dominance, Machiavellianism, and Children’s Social Development
Source:
The Evolution of Personality and Individual Differences
Author(s):

Patricia H. Hawley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195372090.003.0003

This chapter attempts to describe and explain children's social and personality development through an evolutionary lense. It begins by briefly outlining the modern history of evolution and individual differences, including looking at key concepts (e.g., phenotypic plasticity) and using a very promising meta-theoretical perspective (the life history theory). It then reintroduces the construct of “social dominance” and presents arguments to support the critical roles of both prosocial and antisocial behavior in interindividual competition. Third, it sketches out the theoretical (and methodological) implications of social dominance relations for human personality development, and then exemplifies with a theory and body of empirical work exploring children's social dominance relations and the strategies they employ, including a mixed strategy which has been referred to as Machiavellian behavior. The chapter concludes by suggesting that human personality cannot be fully understood without looking towards evolutionary theory.

Keywords:   social development, personality development child development, Machiavellian behavior, social dominance, interindividual competition

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