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NeuroDynamix IIConcepts of Neurophysiology Illustrated by Computer Simulations$
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W. Otto Friesen and Jonathon Friesen

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195371833

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195371833.001.0001

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Neuronal Oscillators

Neuronal Oscillators

Chapter:
(p.126) I.7 Neuronal Oscillators
Source:
NeuroDynamix II
Author(s):

W. Otto Friesen

Jonathon A. Friesen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195371833.003.0007

It is known since the pioneering work of Adrian in the 1931s that the completely isolated nervous system can generate impulse patterns that are correctly structured for commanding meaningful movements. This chapter addresses the question of how neurons form circuits that play specific functional roles in generating animal movements, particularly rhythmic movements. Several mechanisms by which simple circuits can generate rhythmic activity patterns are described. These include reciprocal inhibition in circuits comprising only two neurons, recurrent cyclic inhibition in three-neuron loops, and the basic circuit that generates swimming movements in the sea slug Tritonia.

Keywords:   circuit, oscillation, rhythm, Tritonia, leech, reciprocal inhibition, recurrent cyclic inhibition, synaptic fatigue

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