Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Being Young and MuslimNew Cultural Politics in the Global South and North$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Asef Bayat and Linda Herrera

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195369212

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195369212.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 November 2019

Music VCDs and the New Generation: Negotiating Youth, Femininity, and Islam in Indonesia

Music VCDs and the New Generation: Negotiating Youth, Femininity, and Islam in Indonesia

Chapter:
(p.341) 21 Music VCDs and the New Generation: Negotiating Youth, Femininity, and Islam in Indonesia
Source:
Being Young and Muslim
Author(s):

Suzanne Naafs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195369212.003.0021

This chapter deals with the images of young female artists prevalent in music video compact disks (VCDs) of national and regional music genres in Indonesia and what they reflect about youth lifestyles, Islamic morality, and generational shifts. The music videos of these young female artists reflect a variety of cross-cultural influences that are imported, adapted, recreated, and blended. These influences do not always correspond with prevailing norms about proper behavior and clothing styles for young Muslim women in Indonesia. The three music genres highlighted are pop Indonesia, dangdut, and pop Minang, in addition to western pop and rock. VCDs in these music genres are often directly aimed at teenagers and young adults; the artists portrayed promote not only their music, but a lifestyle. Even though the appropriation of trends and influences from abroad is not new, these VCDs are breaking new ground by combining images of global youth culture in a distinctive Indonesian context, thus adding a visual dimension to the music that previously was not there.

Keywords:   Indonesia, pop culture, music videos, young Muslim women, generation, youth lifestyles, global youth culture, Islamic morality

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .