Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Elements of Cognitive AgingMeta-Analyses of Age-Related Differences in Processing Speed and Their Consequences$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Verhaeghen

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780195368697

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195368697.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 May 2020

Age-related Differences in the Speed of Executive Control

Age-related Differences in the Speed of Executive Control

Chapter:
(p.169) 6 Age-related Differences in the Speed of Executive Control
Source:
The Elements of Cognitive Aging
Author(s):

Paul Verhaeghen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195368697.003.0006

The meta-analyses presented in this chapter lead to two empirical conclusions. First, at the level of absolute age differences—the level older adults deal with in their daily lives, and also the level human-factor psychologists are most interested in—near-universal deficits in executive control are to be noted: Absolute age differences are typically larger for task versions requiring executive control than for versions with minimal control demands. This finding, however, stands in stark contrast to the second conclusion, as revealed by Brinley plots and state traces: Most executive-control tasks do not show age-related deficits over and beyond those already present in their low-control or no-control baseline version. The only exceptions are dual-task performance and task mixing.

Keywords:   age-related slowing, executive control, cognitive control, inhibition, coordination, task switching, dual-task performance

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .