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Infant Perception and CognitionRecent Advances, Emerging Theories, and Future Directions$
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Lisa Oakes, Cara Cashon, Marianella Casasola, and David Rakison

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195366709

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195366709.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 September 2019

The Development of Categorization and Facial Knowledge: Implications for the Study of Autism

The Development of Categorization and Facial Knowledge: Implications for the Study of Autism

Chapter:
(p.223) 11 The Development of Categorization and Facial Knowledge: Implications for the Study of Autism
Source:
Infant Perception and Cognition
Author(s):

Lisa C. Newell

Catherine A. Best

Holly Gastgeb

Keiran M. Rump

Mark S. Strauss

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195366709.003.0011

This chapter illustrates how the current field of infant and adult cognitive theories can elucidate some the mysteries of autistic symptomatology. It first reviews the prevailing cognitive theories of autism, followed by a review of the growing body of evidence that autistic symptoms are present during infancy. It then describes how the current research on deficits in autism fit with theories of the categorization of objects and faces. These findings are presented against a backdrop of an information-processing approach. Finally, the chapter presents data linking categorization theories with symptoms of autism and illustrates how the methods can be applied to identifying autism during infancy.

Keywords:   autism, categorization, information processing, cognitive theory, face recognition, category processing

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