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The Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950$
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Patrick Jamieson and Daniel Romer

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195342956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342956.001.0001

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The Changing Portrayal of Alcohol Use in Television Advertising

The Changing Portrayal of Alcohol Use in Television Advertising

Chapter:
(p.284) 10 The Changing Portrayal of Alcohol Use in Television Advertising
Source:
The Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950
Author(s):

Jennifer Horner

Patrick E. Jamieson

Daniel Romer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342956.003.0011

Beer has long been heavily advertised on television. Sales to youth under age 21 (primarily males) are estimated to represent 16% of alcohol sales. Early initiation of drinking is linked to alcohol disorders throughout life, and irresponsible use increases risks of motor vehicle accidents and a range of other injuries. In the mid-1980s, the national legal drinking age was raised to 21. As a result, adolescents had far greater legal and social barriers to obtaining beer. A content analysis of beer advertising over time indicates that this change was accompanied by a change in advertising themes, with more ads presenting beer as valuable, rare, and sought after — a message absent prior to this time. Alcohol advertising uses narratives that speak directly to adolescents, reinforcing the idea that beer is a precious commodity. More recently, new products such as “alcopops” — sweet alcohol beverages — are being marketed to attract adolescent female users.

Keywords:   adolescents, television, alcohol advertising

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