Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Development AgendaGlobal Intellectual Property and Developing Countries$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Neil Weinstock Netanel

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195342109

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342109.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 March 2020

The WIPO Development Agenda

The WIPO Development Agenda

Chapter:
(p.163) 7 The WIPO Development Agenda
Source:
The Development Agenda
Author(s):

Keith E. Maskus

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342109.003.0007

After reviewing the scope and intentions of the proposed WIPO development agenda, this chapter poses two general questions that might give observers pause about its ultimate implications, if adopted. The first is whether it is sensible for many developing countries, from the standpoint of ensuring access to international technology transfer, to resort to extensive use of such so-called “TRIPS flexibilities” as limitations on patent eligibility, compulsory licensing, working requirements, and unimpeded parallel imports. These policies may be effective components of domestic industrial policy in some development contexts. However, the nature of contemporary technology transfer and integrated production networks means that such limitations on intellectual property protection can reduce the attractiveness of local economies to the activity of international firms. Second, if the development agenda were to insist on significant derogations of IPR rules from TRIPS standards, the developed countries would expect some compensation in other forms of protection, such as harmonization of patent examination procedures and significant investments in IPR enforcement.

Keywords:   TRIPS, technology transfer, foreign direct investment, IPR enforcement

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .