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Sugata SaurabhaAn Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hridaya$
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Todd T. Lewis and Subarna Man Tuladhar

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195341829

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195341829.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

A Pleasant Childhood

A Pleasant Childhood

Chapter:
(p.79) 5 A Pleasant Childhood
Source:
Sugata Saurabha
Author(s):

Todd Lewis (Contributor Webpage)

Subarna Tuladhar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195341829.003.0006

Siddhārtha is depicted as if he had been raised by his foster mother Gautamī in the palace just like an urban Newar of the twentieth century. For example, pyucha bracelets adorn the child when he is two months old; his rice feeding ceremony is performed at six months; a garland of rice cake (yomari) is put around his neck at two years. Here again, the poet was careful not to depict Siddhārtha as supernormal. The ancient biographical text, the Lalitavistara, describes that when young Siddhārtha was taken to Shākya's sacred shrine room, stone images of gods and goddesses fell prostrate on the floor to show reverence. But Chittadhar simply has it that in the presence of the prince the stone images of gods and goddess paled and looked diminished. As King Shuddhodana looks on, the child is taught Newar nursery rhymes, juvenile Newari expressions, folk songs, and literature.

Keywords:   Siddhārtha, Gautamī, rice feeding, Lalitavistara, shrine room, folk songs, nursery rhymes, King Shuddhodana

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