Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
African PentecostalismAn Introduction$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ogbu Kalu

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195340006

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195340006.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 November 2019

 Bakuzufu

 Bakuzufu

Contested Identities and the Quest for Power in African Christianity

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Bakuzufu
Source:
African Pentecostalism
Author(s):

Ogbu Kalu

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195340006.003.0003

Africans have tended to appropriate the charismatic dimensions of the gospel, attracted to the extra power offered by the new religion, and stamped it with an African identity. This charismatic and revivalist ferment could best be described with the Luganda word, bakuzufu, which means reawakened, or renewed, or even resurrected. In the interpretation of global Pentecostalism, the historical discourse argues the need to appreciate the contexts and periods from whence the movement flared up. It argues that the stories of various revitalization movements within such contexts provide the backdrop to the contemporary manifestations of Pentecostalism. These past events charismatized the religious landscapes, providing the agency, goal, popular perception, and naming of the movement. The failure of some historians to pay adequate attention to these precedents, historical roots, and multisites have produced misinterpretations. This chapter argues that in African Pentecostal historiography, the precedents in the colonial period, 1900-60 must be distinguished from the charismatic flares in the independence era, from the 1970s forward.

Keywords:   Africans, Pentacostalism, Christianity, Ethiopianism, gospel, bakuzufu, historical roots

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .